Your go-to beige concealer may not be doing the trick!

Concealer

 

Covering up dark under-eye circles after an all-night Netflix binge can be a losing battle, particularly if you aren’t versed in the art of colour-correcting concealers. Designed to be applied prior to foundation and your normal concealer, these pastel shades may look unconventional, but they can completely neutralise stubborn areas that no amount of beige can hide.

Concealers

Take a closer look at the hues underneath your eyes, then read on to find out which colour-corrector is right for you…

1. Green concealer
Because green is opposite red on the colour wheel, concealers like Maybelline New York Coverstick Concealer Corrector ($10.50; at priceline.com.au) are perfect for muting ruddy tones around your eyes. Plus, they can hide particularly inflamed breakouts.

2. Purple concealer
Lavender concealers, such as NYX Cosmetics Concealer Jar ($5; nyxcosmetics.com), are great for counteracting yellow tones around your eyes, as well as brightening any other yellow-tinted discolouration.

3. Yellow concealer
Just like its green counterpart, yellow works wonders when it comes to muting redness. If your under-eye area tends to have a slight purple or blue tint, a version like NARS Concealer in Pear ($35; at mecca.com.au) is your best bet as the warm hue does double-duty, cancelling out redness while warming up cool undertones.

4. Orange concealer
You know that viral video that shows red lipstick being used to conceal dark circles? An orange-based concealer, such as Benefit Erase Paste in Medium ($47; at myer.com.au), has the same effect if the discoloration under your eyes veers towards the blue or green end of the spectrum as the warm tones lift and neutralise the cool ones. If you have a fair complexion, you may want to pick up the next option…

5. Peach concealer
If you have cool tones under your eyes, but your complexion is too fair for an orange concealer, you’ll want a peach-based colour, like Bobbi Brown Creamy Concealer in Warm Natural ($40; bobbibrown.com.au), which is a less intense way to neutralise green and blue tones.

Article with thanks from Instyle Magazine (Marianne Mychaskiw)